Ubud Monkey Forest

Ubud Monkey Forest

Things to do - general

BALI UBUD MONKEY FOREST

BALI UBUD MONKEY FOREST IS A NATURE RESERVE AND TEMPLE COMPLEX IN UBUD VILLAGE ALSO AS A PLACE OF SCARED MONKEY FOREST SANCTUARY

Ubud Monkey Forest is a nature reserve and Hindu temple complex in Ubud, Bali, Indonesia. Its official name is the Sacred Monkey Forest Sanctuary or Balinese Mandala Suci Wenara Wana. And its name as written on its welcome sign is the Padang Tegal Mandala Wisata Wanara Wana Sacred Monkey Forest Sanctuary. The forest is a popular tourist attraction and is often visited by over 10,000 tourists a month.

The Monkey Forest lies within the village of Padangtegal, which owns it. The village’s residents view the Monkey Forest as an important spiritual, economic, educational, and also conservation center for the village.

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Country Indonesia
Visa requirementsVisa is required
Languages spokenIndonesian,English
Currency usedIDR (Rupiah)

Sports & nature

About monkey habitat on Monkey Forest In 2011, approximately 605 crab-eating macaques (Macaca fascicularis) – 39 adult males, 38 male sub-adults, 194 adult females, 243 juveniles, and 91 infants – lived in the Ubud Monkey Forest; they are known locally as the Balinese long-tailed monkey. The park staff feeds the monkeys sweet potato three times a day, providing them with their main source of food in the park, although bananas are for sale in the park for tourists wishing to feed the monkeys, and the monkeys also feed on papaya leaf, corn, cucumber, coconut, and other local fruit. For the sake of the monkeys' health, visitors are prohibited from feeding them snacks such as peanuts, cookies, biscuits, and bread. Monkey forest areas and facility The Ubud Monkey Forest covers approximately a tenth of a square kilometer (approximately 10 hectares or 27 acres) and contains at least 115 different species of trees. The park is heavily forested and hilly, A deep ravine runs through the park grounds, at the bottom of which flows a rocky stream. Trails allow visitors access to many parts of the park, including the ravine and stream. The Monkey Forest grounds have a forest conservation area, a public hall and gallery, an open stage, a canteen, a first aid center, a police post, parking and toilet facilities, and a composting facility. Sports and nature image

Culture and history info

The Ubud Monkey Forest describes its mission as conservation of the area within its boundaries according to the Hindu principle of Tri Hata Karana ("Three ways to reach spiritual and physical well-being"), which seeks to make people live harmoniously during their lives. The Monkey Forest grounds are home to three Hindu temples, all apparently constructed around 1350: 1. The Pura Dalem Agung Padangtegal ("Padangtegal Great Temple of Death"), also known as the Main Temple, lies in the southwestern part of the park. 2. The Pura Beji, or Beji Temple, in the northwestern part of the park, is used for the worship of Hyang Widhi in personification of the goddess Gangga. 3. The Pura Prajapati, or Prajapati Temple, located in the northeastern part of the park, is used to worship Hyang Widhi in personification of Prajapati. A cemetery adjacent to this temple receives the bodies of the deceased for temporary burial while they await a mass cremation ceremony, held once every five years. Culture and history image

Unfortunately there are no tour offers at this location at the moment.